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COLOUR GENETICS - V locus

The V gene, known as the SILVERING gene, acts in a somewhat similar manner as the C gene, but it acts as a filter limiting the development of dark coat colour (Black or Brown). The silvering gene is often confused with the greying gene because of a similar lightened coat appearance; however, they are not the same and affect colour development in distinctly different ways.

BLACK: Both light and dark silvers are born black. Where there are two copies of the silvering gene, the colour generally clears during the first year leaving the dog a light to medium silver. Where there is a single copy of the silvering gene, the colour can change over 2-3 years to end up medium to dark silver or charcoal. The Silvering gene only affects coat pigment. The nose pigment is black and the eyes dark. These are silvered expressions of dark colour and can appear as the dark coat in any mixed dark/light coat so there may be Silver Brindle, Silver Sable and Silver & Tan although these are certainly less common.

BROWN: The silvering gene can also affect brown leading to chocolate silvers. Chocolate Silvers (light to dark) are born chocolate. Where there are two copies of the silvering gene, the colour clears during the first year to a light silvery brown colour. Where there is a single copy of the silvering gene, the colour change may take two to three years and may end up a medium mocha colour. The silvering gene only affects coat pigment. The nose pigment is liver/brown and the eyes medium/light brown. The chocolate silver (dark/light) are silvered variations of brown and could appear as the dark part of any mixed dark/light coat combinations. Although genetically possible and occasionally occur, multiple recessive combinations are less common occurrences.

dog displays black NON SILVERING BLACK: Two copies of the recessive non-silvering gene.
No colour is filtered and the black develops fully.
Phenotype - dog displays black
Genotype - [ v v , B B] or [ v v , B b ]

dog displays dark silver / charcoalSILVER: One copy of the dominant silvering gene and one copy of the recessive non-silvering gene produce a dark silver or soft charcoal colour.
Phenotype - dog displays dark silver / charcoal coat colour
Genotype - [ V v , B B ] or [ V v , B b ]

dog displays silverSILVER: Two copies of the dominant slivering gene produces a light to medium silver dog.
Phenotype - dog displays silver coat colour
Genotype - [ V V , B B ] or [ V V , B b ]

dog displays chocolate NON SILVERING BROWN: Two copies of the recessive non-silvering gene. No colour is filtered and the brown develops fully giving the deep chocolate dog.
Phenotype - dog displays brown (chocolate)
Genotype - [ v v , b b ]

dog displays dark chocolate silver / mochaDARK CHOCOLATE SILVER: One copy of the dominant silvering gene and one copy of the recessive non-silvering gene produce a dark chocolate silver or mocha colour.
Phenotype - dog displays dark chocolate silver or mocha coat colour
Genotype - [ V v , b b ]

dog displays chocolate silverCHOCOLATE SILVER: Two copies of the dominant slivering gene produces a light to medium chocolate silver dog.
Phenotype - dog displays chocolate silver coat colour
Genotype - [ V V , b b ]

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